The Real Tale behind Retail…Therapy

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Retail Therapy Benefits

According to leading market research group TNS Global amongst others, retail therapy offers certain psychological rewards. Through a series of case studies, focus groups and interviews, it was established that shopping can do the following:

Prepare you mentally – visualise how you might use a product in an important life event, like a wedding or birth.
Increase your confidence – shopping for success. A job interview, for example.
Bring to life the senses – the sensory experience of shopping (ie. Touching, smelling, seeing the product)
Help you relax in a stressed out world – a form of escapism (eg. Window shopping, surfing the Internet, etc)
Be social – the human connection involved with interacting with likeminded shoppers and helpful retail staff.

The Coining of Retail Therapy

“So…” you ask yourself, “…if shopping to pick up one’s spirits isn’t such a bad thing, how did retail therapy get such a bad name?” It would seem that not all things are born with a blank slate: “We’ve become a nation measuring out our lives in shopping bags and nursing our psychic ills through retail therapy” (Chicago Tribune, 1986)…and so the term notoriously enters shopping discourse.

Thinking about Retail Therapy Realistically

There is some truth to the above statement. If you spend irrationally, retail therapy could, quite literally, do the opposite. Resorting to shopping each and every time one needs a mood boost can result in unnecessary debt. And we all know how a financial funk can wreak havoc on your overall wellbeing – including the “psychic ill” you sought to treat in the first place. So do self-medicate wisely.

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In Conclusion…Bag it!

So go ahead. Make the 20th century adage “When the going gets tough, the tough go shopping” your 21st century mantra…

If you’re a retailer and appreciate these insights, you might feel the same about the services VM Central and Olive Studio offer to help you stand out from the retail crowd.

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